In Brief, Football: The History, The Violence, The Grace/Beauty

1rst-intercollef-football-1876-Yale-Vs-PrincetonBernadette Keefe M.D.

Introduction -The Passion, The Inquiry

The Golden Game, the game that decides the 2016 National Football League (NFL) champion, will be played in Santa Clara, California, on Sunday February 7, before a stadium audience of 68,000 and a U.S. television audience likely surpassing 110 million (private TV sets).

Football is immensely popular in the United States. For many, it is a favorite past time and, is often dubbed America’s sport. Football is also big business, with tentacles reaching into two massive empires: media, through TV networks such as ESPN, and gambling, from Las Vegas back rooms to online Fantasy Football websites such as FanDuel and Draftkings.

Notably, football is a particularly violent game, one in which brute strength is as important as skill. The over-riding mission is to destroy/nullify opposing players who stand in the way of ball possession and goals. Injury is common in the sport, and can be severe.

As a Carolina Panthers fan, but also a physician, the violence in football has always been unnerving. For me, the sport’s allure is in the many graceful, athletic moves, especially the leaping, and reaching. For many others, however, it’s the cold, hard violence that thrills. As a prelude to my larger post on football, to be released later this weekend, I wanted to delve into the roots of the sport, and ask: Was football always so violent?

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Popping Pills: A Drugged Nation

 pill-bottle-bannerBernadette Keefe MD

Excerpts from ‘Limitless’ The Movie (Trailer)

You (can) access 100 % your brain

A tablet a day and I was limitless

What’s your secret? Medication

A perfect version of ourselves…..power…..

What would you do???


The ‘Limitless” Trailer  

Introduction: A pill for every ill.

From teenagers to granny, to the pro-athlete, and everyone in between, the United States is the most drugged nation in the world. A staggering:

70 Million Americans are taking legal mind-altering drugs

Nearly 70% of all Americans are on at least one prescription drug and 20% are on at least five prescription drugs Continue reading

Falls Prevention Day 2015: Will the real ______________, please stand up!

              National Falls Prevention Awareness Day ~ September 23, 2015

                                        “Take a Stand to Prevent Falls” 
fallPrevention

 Bernadette Keefe MD

 “One of every three older adults falls each year, but less than half talk to their healthcare providers about it.” – Lawrence Z. Rubenstein MD, MPH Chair Geriatrics – U. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

 Introduction

Tomorrow, September 23, 2015, the U.S. will celebrate the 8th Annual Falls Prevention Awareness Day. The announcement on the National Council for Aging (NCOA) Falls Prevention Day website reads:

“The 8th annual Falls Prevention Awareness Day (FPAD) will be observed on September 23, 2015 – the first day of fall. The event seeks to raise awareness about how to prevent fall – related injuries among older adults. The 2015 theme is Take A Stand to Prevent Falls and the official twitter hashtag for this year’s event is #FPAD15 Continue reading

Our (Cultural) Sugar High

Sugar-comparisons HIGH

Bernadette Keefe MD

‘We need to start talking about how our food supply is making many of us sick.”

 “Sugar high” is the term used to describe the cascade of responses after eating a sugar load. A high sugar load, especially a pure sugar load, triggers is a rapid release of insulin to counteract the high blood sugar. With that response, glucose is absorbed into cells and the blood sugar plummets. We feel hunger with the low blood sugar and if we consume a sugary snack or meal, the cycle restarts. The taste of sugar is also ‘addictive’ over time. At this time we have a cultural sugar high, a palate tuned to the taste of sugar, across our nation and indeed the world. It has led to unprecedented levels of Type 2 diabetes and obesity. Continue reading

The Radiologist – Clinician Relationship

 Fluoroscopy_procedure_1909Image: Thoracic Flouroscopy Using Handheld Screen ~ Circa 1909 via @Wikipedia

Bernadette Keefe MD

 

Classically, the radiologist was known as the doctor’s doctor, and many consultations were carried out in person. Radiology reading rooms of the past were vibrant hubs, where radiologists received in depth and nuanced patient histories from the clinicians, then reviewed /discussed the images and finally the two physicians would reach agreement about next treatment steps. Continue reading

Quadruple Aim: Care of the Physician

Quadruple Aim

By Bernadette Keefe MD and Matthew Katz MD

The classic ‘triple aim’ for healthcare is a framework developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) that describes an approach to optimizing health system performance. IHI asserts that new designs must be developed to simultaneously pursue three dimensions which we call the ‘Triple Aim’:

  • Improving the patient experience of care (including quality and satisfaction)
  • Improving the health of populations, and
  • Reducing the per capita cost of health care

Numerous publications suggest that the list be expanded to a ‘Quadruple Aim’ to include: Improving the Care of and Experience of The Provider (ie MDs/other HCPs).

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a matter of trust

overcoming-writers-block-crumpled-paper-on-wooden-floor-photosteve101

Bernadette Keefe MD

Breaking someone’s trust is like crumpling up a piece of paper. You can smooth it over but it’s never going to be the same again ~ anonymous

There is perhaps no more central concept to human communication and relationships than trust: “belief that someone or something is reliable,good,honest,effective”. This holds true for our professional (business-ie financial, insurance, governmental, healthcare etc) as well as our personal interactions. Once established, trust allows unbridled, open and honest discussion and limitless learning. A trusting environment fosters personal growth, self esteem and generosity. Trust allows the deepest love humans can have. Trust leads to peace.

The absence of trust breeds the opposite of the above. Deep and open relationships are not possible. Communication breaks down on all levels and realms. Unfortunately, overtime we have experienced a breakdown of trust between the people and much of society’s organizational structure: business, government, academia, scientific and healthcare communities. Physicians as messengers are swept up in this tide of mistrust. If the messengers/teachers/researchers of science, education and medicine are not trusted their messages,no matter how factual, will not be accepted and advice will not be adhered to. Gone, happily, are the days of “blind trust”, but, the atmosphere of “no trust” is equally untenable.

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