The 100 Year Lifespan.

aging-fashion

The quality, not the longevity, of one’s life is what is important.

– Martin Luther King Jr.

100 Year Lifespan: The coming reality

The 100 Year lifespan is coming. As of 2014 there were 72,000 centenarians (U.S.) and projections of as many as 1 million by 2050. In the industrialized world, people over 90 years of age are the fastest growing segment of the population. By the end of this century the average life expectancy is expected to be 100 years. Notably, Japan’s centenarians, who number about 30,000, have quadrupled in the last 10 years.

Now there are 43 Million Americans over age 65 years age. By 2050 that number is expected to rise to 108 million. The number of those over 85 years could increase five-fold by that time.

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population health: that means us

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Population Health: ACA and ACOs

Population health has become the lynchpin of healthcare delivery in the United States, especially since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in March 2010. (This law was passed due to the unsustainable costs of US health care coupled with less than stellar population health outcomes in the US.) A key way the ACA proposes to reduce health care costs is through the formation of Accountable Care Organizations (ACO). These are networks of doctors, hospitals, and ancillary health care providers who form networks to coordinate patient care and share financial and medical responsibility for that care. Required by ACOs is coordination by primary care physician, care of Medicare patients, and answering to multiple measures of quality. Providers get paid more for keeping their patients (their local population) healthy and out of the hospital.

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the annual physical

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The Argument: Ditch The Annual

Every year, adults face the issues of is it “time to get a check up”? Do I really want to get my annual physical? Do I need to have a checkup? Well now, even your doctor is saying the same thing! A chorus of physicians have weighed over the past several years (especially after the Cochrane Report was released). The consensus has been, for the most part: ditch the annual physical if you are healthy and have no medical symptoms.

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